Jessica Gofforth is Proof that Millennials Mean Business

MMB-Jessica-Inline.png

Mikayla Lien

By: Mikayla Lien

According to the Pew Research Center, "More than one-in-three American workers today are Millennials, and [in 2015] they surpassed Generation X to become the largest share of the American workforce." Millennials, defined as people born from 1981 to 1997, are commonly labeled with negative characteristics: entitled, lazy and self-centered. In addition, it‘s said that millennials need constant praise, have a tendency to ‘job-hop,‘ and take little direction from superiors.

Although these misconceptions can be heard nationwide, UNIBusiness alums are singing a different tune.

Jessica Gofforth (Business Administration and Management, Human Resources, ‘12) has been breaking millennial stereotypes since day one. At age 26, she is a human resource business partner for Bemis Co. Inc. and recently was recognized as a millennial who is "leading HR into the future," in 30 Under 30 for the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM).

Unlike her generational stereotype, Gofforth is no stranger to commitment and hard work. While at UNI she served as president of UNI-SHRM, participated in Presidents‘ Council, and worked for the UNI Office of Admissions as a Student Telecounseling Admissions Representative (STAR.) She believes this type of  involvement helped prepare her for the real world. "These groups allowed me to network with companies, professors, and staff that eventually helped launch my career."

Gofforth served as the College Relations Director for the Iowa SHRM State Council, where she served as the liaison between student chapters in Iowa. The following year, she founded the first Student Leadership Summit. Most recently, Gofforth coordinated a student and young professionals track at the Iowa SHRM State Conference.

It‘s this type of work ethic and determination that has helped her overcome the challenges and stereotypes of being a millennial. "I think the biggest challenge I've faced is the 'you're too young, you don't know anything' mentality I've seen from a few of my colleagues. I became a manager at 25 years old, and have had to overcome some stigmas associated with being a young manager."

But the negative opinions have not stopped her. "I‘ll be the first to admit that I‘m a job hopper, but not in the way that people attribute to being a millennial." Gofforth was attracted to rotation programs in other areas of study that allow recent college graduates to test out multiple roles right out of school. At the time, HR didn‘t have a rotation program; so Gofforth created her own. That allowed her to gain knowledge in different areas of HR and has diversified her résumé. Her advice to other fellow ‘job-hoppers‘ is to be sure you can justify your moves to an employer in a positive light.

The best part about being a millennial, Gofforth shared, is that this generation is constantly redefining the modern workplace. "Before we started entering the workforce, discussions around company culture, corporate social responsibility, and workplace flexibility were merely a thought. Now it‘s some of the key factors in driving recruitment and retention for companies everywhere."

Posted on 31-Mar-17


  






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Jessica Gofforth is Proof that Millennials Mean Business

MMB-Jessica-Inline.png

Mikayla Lien

By: Mikayla Lien

According to the Pew Research Center, "More than one-in-three American workers today are Millennials, and [in 2015] they surpassed Generation X to become the largest share of the American workforce." Millennials, defined as people born from 1981 to 1997, are commonly labeled with negative characteristics: entitled, lazy and self-centered. In addition, it‘s said that millennials need constant praise, have a tendency to ‘job-hop,‘ and take little direction from superiors.

Although these misconceptions can be heard nationwide, UNIBusiness alums are singing a different tune.

Jessica Gofforth (Business Administration and Management, Human Resources, ‘12) has been breaking millennial stereotypes since day one. At age 26, she is a human resource business partner for Bemis Co. Inc. and recently was recognized as a millennial who is "leading HR into the future," in 30 Under 30 for the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM).

Unlike her generational stereotype, Gofforth is no stranger to commitment and hard work. While at UNI she served as president of UNI-SHRM, participated in Presidents‘ Council, and worked for the UNI Office of Admissions as a Student Telecounseling Admissions Representative (STAR.) She believes this type of  involvement helped prepare her for the real world. "These groups allowed me to network with companies, professors, and staff that eventually helped launch my career."

Gofforth served as the College Relations Director for the Iowa SHRM State Council, where she served as the liaison between student chapters in Iowa. The following year, she founded the first Student Leadership Summit. Most recently, Gofforth coordinated a student and young professionals track at the Iowa SHRM State Conference.

It‘s this type of work ethic and determination that has helped her overcome the challenges and stereotypes of being a millennial. "I think the biggest challenge I've faced is the 'you're too young, you don't know anything' mentality I've seen from a few of my colleagues. I became a manager at 25 years old, and have had to overcome some stigmas associated with being a young manager."

But the negative opinions have not stopped her. "I‘ll be the first to admit that I‘m a job hopper, but not in the way that people attribute to being a millennial." Gofforth was attracted to rotation programs in other areas of study that allow recent college graduates to test out multiple roles right out of school. At the time, HR didn‘t have a rotation program; so Gofforth created her own. That allowed her to gain knowledge in different areas of HR and has diversified her résumé. Her advice to other fellow ‘job-hoppers‘ is to be sure you can justify your moves to an employer in a positive light.

The best part about being a millennial, Gofforth shared, is that this generation is constantly redefining the modern workplace. "Before we started entering the workforce, discussions around company culture, corporate social responsibility, and workplace flexibility were merely a thought. Now it‘s some of the key factors in driving recruitment and retention for companies everywhere."

Posted on 31-Mar-17







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Maintained by UNIBusiness webmaster
Copyright ©2011 by University of Northern Iowa College of Business Administration