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Five Things to Avoid When Negotiating Your Salary

Negotiating-Salary-UNI-Business-Inline.png

You‘ve done it. You‘ve successfully maneuvered through the job application and interview process, and there‘s an offer on the table. Now what? Some experts will tell you that you are expected to negotiate at this point or you‘ll appear to be weak and underconfident, but there‘s little evidence to back that up. If you‘re happy with the offer, take it, and congratulations. But usually there‘s no harm in asking for more.

That being said, there are do‘s and don‘ts about the negotiation process, whether you‘re discussing a salary, a used car, a real estate transaction or who‘s doing the dishes. Rowena (Ro) Crosbie is president of Tero International in Des Moines, a company that focuses on interpersonal skills research and corporate training. She and her colleagues have some definite don‘ts for the process. 

1. DON‘T go into a negotiation with only one option.
"You‘re setting yourself up for failure," says Crosbie. "Without a Plan B, you may never come to an agreement or you may end up giving up more than you can afford," she says.

Crosbie advises spending time before your negotiation session thinking about which party has the most to gain or lose. If you‘re sitting in a position where you have three job offers, you may have more leverage than the person with whom you‘re negotiating a final compensation package. If the employer has three highly qualified candidates, and you don‘t have any other prospects, the employer is probably better situated. Obviously, you don‘t always know the cards the other negotiator is holding, but it‘s important to find out as much as you can before you come to the table.

2. DON‘T be irritating.
Tero‘s YouTube video, "How to Go From an Average to a Great Negotiator," lists the three phrases that can be irritating in a discussion.

a. The phrase "you should" can be offensive to other people.
b. The phrase "yes, but" is also potentially offensive, and the word "but" negates the word "yes."
c. The phrase "to be honest" might call into question whether you‘ve been honest in other statements you‘ve made.

3. DON‘T put yourself first in your thinking or in your discussion.
"We have a lot of trouble getting out of ourselves," Crosbie says. "Try to put yourself in the seat of the other party. Consider your own interests but try to see the deal from the other side of the table."

One effective tool for helping think that way is to practice your pronouns. "Eliminate as many of the ‘I, me and my‘ statements as possible and use plural pronouns such as we, us and our," Crosbie advises.

4. DON‘T focus only on the money.
When you‘re negotiating your compensation package for a new job, there‘s more to talk about than salary. Make sure you take into full consideration the benefits package and its total value. It may be worth taking a lower salary, for example, for a smaller out-of-pocket for health insurance, or more time off. 

You can negotiate for flexibility in your work hours and location, says Ann Block (Management ‘83), vice president of client relations at Tero. Many employers are willing to allow employees to work from home, at least some of the time, or outside the typical workday or -week. In fact, Block says, if you can be creative in selling the benefits of flexible hours ("I can come in earlier or stay later to accommodate clients in different time zones"), that may help you negotiate a higher salary, as it provides something to your employer that can add to their bottom line.

5. DON‘T sell yourself short. (Women, read this section twice; you‘re much more likely to do this than men.)
In general, women are conditioned by our culture not to feel they are deserving, and compensation is often higher for those perceived to "deserve" more, says Tero Vice President and Chief Learning Officer Deb Rinner.

Block says it‘s important for women to stand firm and put themselves on an equal playing field right up front. "Women should negotiate the same as men," she says.

No matter what your gender, a good way to show your value is to quantify the benefits you bring to the company.  When you are discussing the positive things you‘ve done in your current or previous positions, try to place a dollar value on those accomplishments. Instead of saying, "I was responsible for bringing in three new clients, which was an interesting challenge," say, "I brought in three new clients in one year, adding $XXX to the company‘s revenue."
 

Posted on 15-Nov-17


  






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Five Things to Avoid When Negotiating Your Salary

Negotiating-Salary-UNI-Business-Inline.png

You‘ve done it. You‘ve successfully maneuvered through the job application and interview process, and there‘s an offer on the table. Now what? Some experts will tell you that you are expected to negotiate at this point or you‘ll appear to be weak and underconfident, but there‘s little evidence to back that up. If you‘re happy with the offer, take it, and congratulations. But usually there‘s no harm in asking for more.

That being said, there are do‘s and don‘ts about the negotiation process, whether you‘re discussing a salary, a used car, a real estate transaction or who‘s doing the dishes. Rowena (Ro) Crosbie is president of Tero International in Des Moines, a company that focuses on interpersonal skills research and corporate training. She and her colleagues have some definite don‘ts for the process. 

1. DON‘T go into a negotiation with only one option.
"You‘re setting yourself up for failure," says Crosbie. "Without a Plan B, you may never come to an agreement or you may end up giving up more than you can afford," she says.

Crosbie advises spending time before your negotiation session thinking about which party has the most to gain or lose. If you‘re sitting in a position where you have three job offers, you may have more leverage than the person with whom you‘re negotiating a final compensation package. If the employer has three highly qualified candidates, and you don‘t have any other prospects, the employer is probably better situated. Obviously, you don‘t always know the cards the other negotiator is holding, but it‘s important to find out as much as you can before you come to the table.

2. DON‘T be irritating.
Tero‘s YouTube video, "How to Go From an Average to a Great Negotiator," lists the three phrases that can be irritating in a discussion.

a. The phrase "you should" can be offensive to other people.
b. The phrase "yes, but" is also potentially offensive, and the word "but" negates the word "yes."
c. The phrase "to be honest" might call into question whether you‘ve been honest in other statements you‘ve made.

3. DON‘T put yourself first in your thinking or in your discussion.
"We have a lot of trouble getting out of ourselves," Crosbie says. "Try to put yourself in the seat of the other party. Consider your own interests but try to see the deal from the other side of the table."

One effective tool for helping think that way is to practice your pronouns. "Eliminate as many of the ‘I, me and my‘ statements as possible and use plural pronouns such as we, us and our," Crosbie advises.

4. DON‘T focus only on the money.
When you‘re negotiating your compensation package for a new job, there‘s more to talk about than salary. Make sure you take into full consideration the benefits package and its total value. It may be worth taking a lower salary, for example, for a smaller out-of-pocket for health insurance, or more time off. 

You can negotiate for flexibility in your work hours and location, says Ann Block (Management ‘83), vice president of client relations at Tero. Many employers are willing to allow employees to work from home, at least some of the time, or outside the typical workday or -week. In fact, Block says, if you can be creative in selling the benefits of flexible hours ("I can come in earlier or stay later to accommodate clients in different time zones"), that may help you negotiate a higher salary, as it provides something to your employer that can add to their bottom line.

5. DON‘T sell yourself short. (Women, read this section twice; you‘re much more likely to do this than men.)
In general, women are conditioned by our culture not to feel they are deserving, and compensation is often higher for those perceived to "deserve" more, says Tero Vice President and Chief Learning Officer Deb Rinner.

Block says it‘s important for women to stand firm and put themselves on an equal playing field right up front. "Women should negotiate the same as men," she says.

No matter what your gender, a good way to show your value is to quantify the benefits you bring to the company.  When you are discussing the positive things you‘ve done in your current or previous positions, try to place a dollar value on those accomplishments. Instead of saying, "I was responsible for bringing in three new clients, which was an interesting challenge," say, "I brought in three new clients in one year, adding $XXX to the company‘s revenue."
 

Posted on 15-Nov-17







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Maintained by UNIBusiness webmaster
Copyright ©2011 by University of Northern Iowa College of Business Administration