David Surdam

Professor of Economics




Education

Ph.D. (Economics) University of Chicago; A.M. (Economics) University of Chicago; B.A. (Mathematics) Robert D. Clark Honors College University of Oregon.


Teaching Interests

Introduction to Economics, Principles of Micro-economics. Introduction to Decision Techniques. Sports Economics, Industrial Organization. Managerial Economics for the MBA.


Research Interests

Economics of professional sports leagues. Economics of the American Civil War. History of Business Ethics.


Professional Accomplishments

David Surdam received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. His dissertation, "Northern Naval Superiority and the Economics of the American Civil War," was supervised by Nobel-Prize Winner, Robert Fogel. Professor Surdam has taught at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Loyola University of Chicago, and the University of Oregon. Since completion of his degree, he has had 18 articles and 8 books published. His interest in using applied microeconomics to historical topics has resulted in publications concerning various economic issues of the National Football League, Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, and the American Civil War, including new books, Century of the Leisured Masses and The Big Leagues Go To Washington. His publications can be found in such journals as the Journal of Sports Economics, Naval War College Review, Louisiana History, Journal of Economic History, and Agricultural History, Southern Economic Journal and Journal of Economic Education to name a few. Received the James F. Lubker Faculty Research Award, 2015-2016. David joined the faculty at UNI in 2005.


Latest News & Views


news media at press conference
News bias? You choose the news you wish to consume

During election season, people love to accuse the media of bias. Liberals and conservatives assail local and national newspapers, as well as various television newscasts, of tilting in one political direction or another. Since it is unlikely that a news source can be biased in both directions, many people’s perceptions must be erroneous.

1 month 4 days ago
UNI business students at career fair
The complete guide to choosing a college major

College is an exciting time in your life, but don’t spend all four years merely enjoying it – you should take advantage of this time to determine exactly what you want to do with your life. This article will help you decide how to choose your college major that fits your long-term goals.

1 month 1 week ago
digital face
Scammers have not fallen victim to COVID-19

The COVID-19 epidemic has revealed that scammers are still alive and well. They nimbly offered nostrums to prevent or cure the virus to naïve buyers within a few weeks of the epidemic’s explosion. In doing so, the medical quacksters have lived up to their predecessors: let no health scare or new technology go to waste.

1 month 4 weeks ago
tax refund check with U.S. dollars
Moral hazard in the labor market

In the wake of the disruption in America’s economy, legislators on both sides of the aisle quickly rushed through palliatives for American businesses and workers. In doing so, they may have created situations rife with what economists call “moral hazard,” situations where the affected parties have disincentives to mitigate losses.

1 month 4 weeks ago